Samples

/Samples/
  • Fossil amber with botanical inclusions have not been studied by the international scientific community as extensively as amber with animal inclusions. This Sample contains stamens and various kinds of paleobotanical remains. It was found in the La Bucara Mine (Summer 2014).
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Oligocene - Lower Miocene (ca. 30-20 Mya) Size: 30,9 x 26,7 x 10,6 mm Weight: 5,2 g Biological fossil inclusions: stamens and various kinds of paleobotanical remains.
  • A magnificent petal with all the veins well defined. This beautiful Sample would make an important addition to any Paleobotanical collection. Found in the La Bucara Mine (Summer 2014).
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Oligocene - Lower Miocene (ca. 30-20 Mya) Size: 29,6 x 28,2 x 12,4 mm Weight: 5,5 g Biological fossil inclusion: petal with all the veins well defined.
  • Millipedes are Arthropods in the Class of Diplopoda characterized by having two pairs of jointed legs on body segments. Phalangida (or Opiliones) is an Order of Arachnids commonly known as harvestmen. Phalangida are known for having exceptionally long legs relative to their body size; however, some species are short-legged. The most obvious difference between harvestmen and spiders is that in harvestmen the connection between the cephalothorax and abdomen is broad, so that the body appears to be a single oval structure. Phalangida have no venom glands in their chelicerae. Ants are social insects of the Family Formicidae, along with the related wasps and bees, belong to the order Hymenoptera. Ants evolved from wasp-like ancestors in the Middle Cretaceous period between 130 and 110 million years ago and diversified after the rise of flowering plants. This piece is very interesting and deserves to be part of a serious collection, because it contains three beautiful, well preserved specimens belonging to three different classes of Phylum Arthropoda: Arachnida, Diplopoda and Insecta. The amber stone comes from La Bucara Mine (Summer 2014).
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Oligocene - Lower Miocene (ca. 30-20 Mya) Size: 23,7 x 14,5 x 8,6  mm Weight: 1,6 g Biological fossil inclusions: Millipede (Diplopoda), Daddy long legs (Phalangida) and Ant (Hymenoptera formicidae).
  • Moths are a group of Insects related to butterflies, belonging to the Order Lepidoptera. Most species of moths are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species. Moths are not common in Dominican amber. This specimen, very well displayed in a clear amber gemstone excavated in the Summer 2015, in El Cabao Mine, maintains all the scales covering the wings perfectly preserved.
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Miocene - Middle Miocene (ca. 20-15 Mya) Size: 14,5 x 10,0 x 4,6 mm Weight: 0,4 g Biological fossil inclusion: Moth (Lepidoptera).
  • This Sample is a beautiful, perfectly preserved, juvenile praying Mantid in a raptorial attitude, with its spiny forelegs ready to capture a prey. The body is thin and elongate, the antennae and the hind legs are very long, the head is triangular with very large compound eyes. The name Mantid, which means “diviner”, was given to this insect by the ancient Greeks because they believed that it had supernatural powers. Excavated in the La Bucara amber Mine (Autumn 2015).
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Oligocene - Lower Miocene (ca. 30-20 Mya) Size: 43 x 39 x 8 mm Weight: 12 g Biological fossil inclusion: Praying Mantid, juvenile (Mantodea, Mantidae). Length of fossil inclusion: 8,5 mm.
  • The first spiders  evolved  from crab-like Chelicerate ancestors over 400 million years ago. Today, there are more than 45.000 described spider species within the  phylum of arthropods.  Anatomically, spiders differ from other Arthropods in that the usual body segments are fused into two parts, the cephalothorax  and abdomen, and joined by a small, cylindrical pedicel. Unlike insects, spiders do not have antennae. This interesting specimen was trapped at least 20 million years ago in an amber stone excavated in La Bucara Mine in the Winter of 2014.
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Oligocene - Lower Miocene (ca. 30-20 Mya) Size: 16,1 x 15,0 x 7,3 mm Weight: 1,0 g Biological fossil inclusion: Spider.
  • During the course of each year, numerous small, immature Termites from established colonies transform into larger nymphs with wing buds. Some time later, these individuals further transform into sexually mature males and females called swarmers or alates. Swarmers have two pairs of long narrow wings of equal size. Unlike other Termites in the colony, swarmers are dark-colored, and almost black in some species. This swarm was captured about 20-15 million years ago in an amber gemstone excavated in Km 20 - El Valle Mine (Summer 2014).
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Miocene - Middle Miocene (ca. 20-15 Mya) Size: 30,7 x 24,5 x 8,4 mm Weight: 3,2 g Biological fossil inclusions: Swarm of winged Termites (Isoptera).
  • Commonly known as trap-jaw ants,  Anochetus ants  have a pair of large, straight mandibles capable of opening 180 degrees.  The mandibles are powerful and fast, giving the ant its common name. The mandibles either kill or maim the prey, allowing the ant to bring it back to the nest. The mandibles also permit slow and fine movements for other tasks such as nest building and care of larvae. This iconic specimen was trapped over twenty million years ago in a transparent amber stone excavated in La Bucara Mine in the Spring of 2015.
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Oligocene - Lower Miocene (ca. 30-20 Mya) Size: 13,9 x 10,3 x 4,5 mm Weight: 0,4 g Biological fossil inclusion: Trap jaw Ant anochetus (Formicidae ponerinae anochetus).
  • Two blooming flowers perfectly preserved intact. A remarkable Botanical testimony dating back to 25 million years ago! A very beautiful Sample for collectors. It was found in the La Bucara Mine in the Summer of 2015.
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Oligocene - Lower Miocene (ca. 30-20 Mya) Size: 37,5 x 22,8 x 8,4 mm Weight: 3,9 g Biological fossil inclusions: two blooming flower perfectly preserved intact.
  • Weevils belong to the Family curculionidae, the third-largest animal family, with over 40,000 species described worldwide. Weevils can be easily recognised by the long rostrum or snout, an elongated part of the front portion of the head. This beautiful specimen was excavated in El Cabao Mine (Summer 2014).
     
    Material: Natural Amber
    Origin: Dominican Republic Geological age: Lower Miocene - Middle Miocene (ca. 20-15 Mya) Size: 23,3 x 15,2 x 7,7mm Weight: 1,6 g Biological fossil inclusion: Weevil (Coleoptera Curculionidae).